University of Virginia: School of Architecture

All-School Research Focus: Water

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Drink.

Water defines the blue planet, Earth.  Its surface is 71% water; our bodies are roughly 60% water.  But water's distribution is uneven and unfair.  Even in climatically stable times, parts of the planet receive less or more rainfall, leading to deserts and rain forests, each with inventive human adaptations.  In today's time of rapid change, evidenced in sharp population increase and mass migrations, dramatic resurfacing of lands through deforestation and erosion, and catastrophic weather events, water can amplify this destabilization.  Often negative impacts disproportionately fall to those least able to protect themselves: many of the world's poorest people live in flooding deltas; others drink polluted water; and millions walk miles daily to find it.   But not always:  hurricanes do not avoid wealthy communities, polluted or drying aquifers serve the rich and poor alike, floods ravage lakeside vacation homes, and tidal surges wash out everything at the water's edge.  Nonetheless, it is often said that a small minority of the people on the planet use the vast majority of its resources, water included.

How can we imagine the blue planet in equilibrium, with adequate water where we need it, when we need it?  How can we re-imagine the theoretical and physical construction of adaptive water infrastructures, equitable distribution systems, and daily individual practices? Can water be safe to drink and to bathe in and, very selectively, to use for irrigation?  What can we learn from the past and from cultures beyond our own?  Can we envision preferred futures in which the constructed environment is part of the solution?   How can we hold in our minds and practices the paradox that water is equally a design element, a valuable resource, and a dangerous threat?

At the School of Architecture we focus on water in our daily actions, in our teaching, and through our research.  From the rain garden at Campbell Hall, designed by Nelson Byrd Woltz as part of the Campbell Constructions, to a study-abroad program in India and a recent alumni project based in Cape Town, Ghana, to a longtime focus on coastal resilience and clean water, faculty, students, staff, and alumni have concentrated on the importance of water on the blue planet.  During the 2012-13 academic year we will further concentrate our efforts on water, through ongoing coursework and a special series of lectures, exhibits, and an all-school charrette on Charlottesville’s Rivanna River.

A Zen saying tells us, “If you want to understand the teachings of water, just drink.”  At the School of Architecture, we do.

For more, visit The Water Index, a blog that tracks various SARC water activities this year as well as water resources within the School. 

Updated: December 18, 2012

Isaac Cohen (MLA'13 and Howland Travelling Fellow) to present at Eruv Symposium

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Isaac Cohen (MLA'13) will present at the Mystery and History of the Eruv Symposum at the Yeshiva University Museum Center for Jewish History on Sunday, October 28. His presentation, titled "Expanding Eruv: Urban Typologies and the Making of Jewish Space," will develop his research initiated on the Howland Travelling Fellowship.

See the attached document for the symposium schedule and information.

Updated: October 22, 2012

$2 Million Gift will Fund Professorship in Design and Health

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CANDIDATE SEARCH FOR THE MARY IRENE DESHONG ASSOCIATE OR FULL PROFESSOR OF DESIGN AND HEALTH
(applications due December 31, 2012; posting open until February 1, 2012)

"The University of Virginia School of Architecture Foundation has received a $2 million gift to establish a cross-disciplinary professorship in design and health.

The Mary Irene DeShong Professorship in Design and Health at the School of Architecture was established by two anonymous donors to support the mission of the school’s Center for Design and Health, launched in May 2011, and to foster a new curriculum centered on design and health within the school. The center is believed to be the only research center in the U.S. that focuses on a variety of health issues across a wide range of scales and regions as well as the design and planning of patient-centered health care facilities, healing gardens and learning centers."

Updated: December 12, 2012

Lunch: The Student Journal of the UVA School of Architecture

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www.uvalunch.com

lunch is a student-run publication of faculty, student, and alumni work at the University of Virginia School of Architecture.

 

[The term 'lunch' is an informal derivation of the word luncheon. The colloquialism of the term coupled with some 'talk of you and me' speaks to the core intention of this collection. lunch is inspired by chance; by chance discussions that grow from a meal in a shared setting and by chance discussions that alter or challenge views of the space and place we inhabit. lunch provides for the meeting of diverse voices in common place tended by a casual atmosphere. To lunch suggests an escape from the day's work; perhaps even a break. The works collected in previous editions of lunch mix a range of studies, conversations, drawings, statements, and stories that together aspire to reflect the student and educational experience at the University of Virginia School of Architecture.]

Updated: November 25, 2013

A-School to Welcome 11 New Faculty in Fall 2012

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A European garden expert, architects from Spain, a geophysicist-turned-architect, a planning and land use expert who has advised communities in Kenya and Uganda, and a former South Carolina trim carpenter—all of these are among the University of Virginia School of Architecture’s newest faculty recruits.

“I am excited to welcome our 11 new faculty members this fall,” Dean Kim Tanzer said. “They will bring their unique and varied experiences from around the world, as well as their collaborative and interdisciplinary teachings to help further the vision of the A-school.”

This year’s cohort of incoming faculty is larger than usual—more than twice the 2011 volume of hires—and the culmination of a year-long search process full of interviews and committee work.

In addition to filling gaps in important areas of expertise, the appointments represent the School’s broader, continued effort to internationalize the curriculum, promote civic engagement, and build collaborative, multidisciplinary links across departments—and beyond to other schools at U.Va.

Landscape architect and historian Michael Lee has been named the A-school’s Reuben McCorkle Rainey Professor in the History of Landscape Architecture. A published author specializing in the intersection of philosophy, literature, and landscape design in Europe, Lee was most recently a postdoctoral associate at Dumbarton Oaks—the Harvard-run research library and collection in Washington, DC.

Other incoming faculty include Virginia Teaching Fellow Brian Osborn, who founded  and directs BOTH Landscape and Architecture firm in New York and is visiting for the next two years from Rutgers University, as well as returning A-school faculty member Jeana Ripple, whose knowledge of computing as applied to design will be invaluable to the Department of Architecture. Ripple previously taught at the A-school from 2006 to 2008.

Newly appointed as an associate professor, Suzanne Moomaw will continue using her varied experience in Community and Economic Development to strengthen the Department of Urban and Environmental Planning at the A-school, where she has been teaching since 2009.

All new School of Architecture faculty for fall 2012 are listed below by department, with links to more details about their backgrounds.


Department of Architecture:

Ghazal Abbasy-Asbagh, Lecturer

Matthew Jull, Assistant Professor

Esther Lorenz, Lecturer

Seth McDowell, Assistant Professor

Jordi Nebot, Lecturer

Jeana Ripple, Assistant Professor

 

Department of Landscape Architecture:

Teresa Galí-Izard, Associate Professor of Landscape Architecture

Michael Lee, Reuben McCorkle Rainey Professor in the History of Landscape Architecture/Associate Professor

Brian Osborn, Visiting Lecturer

Leena Cho, Visiting Lecturer

 

Department of Urban and Environmental Planning:

Ellen Bassett, Associate Professor

Suzanne Morse Moomaw, Associate Professor

Updated: August 10, 2012

ARH 5602: Chimborazo Park Study

Group project ARH 5602: Community History Workshop Related faculty:
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Project Details

Chimborazo Park Study

Semester project

Each year, the University of Virginia Community History Workshop undertakes an in-depth historical analysis of the architecture, planning, and landscape form of a single Virginia community. The investigation focuses upon social and cultural history as it relates to and is expressed in community design. Using building, population census, land conveyance, subdivision, condemnation, tax, probate and other archival records, members of the class from all disciplines explore how the meaning of place is invented and reinvented through time. The fall portion of this year long class provides the background research that is then used as the basis for design, narrative and planning proposals in the spring semester.

The example above highlights the fall research completed and exhibition assembled for Chimborazo Park in the City of Richmond. Over the last 200 years, the land on this prominent bluff overlooking the James River has been transformed from fields of corn, wheat, and oats, to the site of Confederate barracks and one of the largest Confederate military hospitals. It has also served as a Freedmen’s Bureau refugee camp for freed slaves, and then finally Richmond’s first expansive landscaped park. Today, Chimborazo Park continues to serve as recreational space for the neighborhood of Church Hill. The exhibit created by students and presented to area representatives is intended to enrich the experience of the park and the City of Richmond for local residents and visitors as well as to serve as the foundation for continuing design and planning work in the spring semester . For more information about the park see http://www.richmondgov.com/parks/parkChimborazo.aspx

Shiqiao Li

Weedon Professor
Shiqiao Li
Discipline ,
Education PhD (Birkbeck College, University of London / AA School of Architecture, London)
AAGradDip (AA School of Architecture, London)
BArch (Tsinghua University, Beijing)
Phone 434-924-6444
Office 319 Campbell

Personal Statement

 

Shiqiao Li took up his position in 2012 as Weedon Professor in Asian Architecture, School of Architecture, University of Virginia, where he teaches and researches into emerging issues in contemporary Chinese cities. This adds to a teaching portfolio which includes history and theory courses and design studio instruction; under his studio instruction, his students won several first prizes in international student design competitions, and were nominated and shortlisted for RIBA President’s Medal. He studied architecture at Tsinghua University in Beijing and obtained his PhD from AA School of Architecture and Birkbeck College, University of London. Li practiced architecture in London and Hong Kong, and initiated design proposals which were published and exhibited in journals and international exhibitions. His writings appeared in: Bauwelt, Domus China, World Architecture, Cultural Politics, Theory Culture & Society, Cultural Studies (Wenhua Yanjiu), The Journal of Architecture, Journal of Architectural Education, Architectural Theory Review, Fabrications: The Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand, and Journal of Society of Architectural Historians. His books include Understanding the Chinese City (London: Sage, 2014), Architecture and Modernization (xiandai sixiang zhong de jianzhu, Beijing, 2009) and Power and Virtue, Architecture and Intellectual Change in England 1650-1730 (London and New York: Routledge, 2007). He is External Examiner for PhD degrees at the RMIT University and University of New South Wales, International Judge for RIBA President’s Medal for Dissertations in 2006. He was keynote speaker at University of Johannesburg, RMIT University, Melbourne University, Southeast University, Peking University, Beijing Normal University, and lectured at University of Virginia, University of Sheffield, Bartlett School London, University of Tokyo, CEPT University Ahmadabad, University of Pennsylvania, Harbin Institute of Technology, Tsinghua University, Nanjing University, University of Queensland, and University of New South Wales. Prior to coming to Virginia, he taught at AA School of Architecture, National University of Singapore and The Chinese University of Hong Kong.

Personal Gallery

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4 of 15 The Force of Things (Research Studio, UVA)
5 of 15 The Force of Things (Research Studio, UVA)
6 of 15 Cabinet of Curiosities, Hong Kong Biennale 2010 (with Esther Lorenz and MArch Studio)
7 of 15 Cabinet of Curiosities, Hong Kong Biennale 2010 (with Esther Lorenz and MArch Studio)
8 of 15 Knowledge as Infrastructure (with Ryan Bishop, John Phillips, Andrew Benjamin, Esther Lorenz, Scott Lash, Urbanus)
9 of 15 Knowledge as Infrastructure, Shenzhen 2009 (illustration Urbanus)
10 of 15 Baowu Hotel (with BHSL Design)
11 of 15 Menuless Restaurant Competition (with BHSL Design)
12 of 15 TST 360 Competition with Esther Lorenz and Ferna Shum
13 of 15 Take Flight, a workshop with Jon Tarry (MArch Studio, CUHK)
14 of 15 Take Flight, a workshop with Jon Tarry (MArch Studio, CUHK)
15 of 15 Take Flight, a workshop with Jon Tarry (MArch Studio, CUHK)

ARH 7401: Constructing Privacy: Richard Neutra's Westwood Apartments

Justin Greving ARH 7401: Modern Architecture, Graduate Related faculty:
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Project Details

12 week project.

 In the span of just over a decade the renowned architect Richard Neutra constructed four apartment buildings in the Westwood area of Los Angeles next to UCLA. The Landfair and Strathmore apartments were completed in 1937, The Kelton apartments in 1942, and just a few years later, in 1948, the Kievman apartments appeared on the market. Though all four projects have been commonly referred to as “apartments” they nonetheless exhibit a built form drastically different from Neutra’s earlier Jardinette apartments in Hollywood, as well as his much later Poster apartments in East Los Angeles. The four Westwood apartments are clearly not houses as they all incorporate multiple distinct living units on each lot, however they also do not conform to a typical stacked apartment type, with multiple units aligned in a uniform configuration. Authors have attempted to reconcile this hybrid apartment form by associating it with other more familiar building types, referring to the Landfair apartments as a modern adaptation of the row house and Strathmore apartments as being Neutra’s update of the bungalow court. However these translations of more traditional housing typologies are ill fitting and do not reflect Neutra’s incorporation of garages or his adjustment for the relatively small lot size on which these buildings sit. In this paper I argue the apartments by Neutra in Westwood point to a unique transformation as he translated his approach to the single family house into the multiple-unit apartment. A formal analysis of the apartments, combined with their reception at the time and in the years to come, reveal how Neutra transformed the relationship between public and private space in buildings that sit somewhere on the spectrum between house and apartment.

 

ARH 9570: The Architecture of Women’s Education, 1770-1830

Camille Behnke ARH/ARAH 9570 The Architecture of Thomas Jefferson, Graduate Related faculty:
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Project Details

The architecture of education is well documented by notables such as Henry Barnard in the early 20th century and Horace Mann in the 19th century. However, very little has been written regarding the period just before Mann. In 1770, education begins to take place outside of the home. Through the American Revolution questions about boys and girls’ education arise and labels for the purpose of a woman in society develop such as Republican Motherhood and Republican Womanhood. This project examines three female educational environments between 1770 and 1830. Martha Jefferson’s fashionable French convent school, the Abbaye de Pentemont, under constant construction from 1747 to 1790, is explored for its neo-classical palatial architecture. Closer to Jefferson’s Southern home, the Moravian Female Academy, committed to equality in education and community values, was founded in Winston-Salem, North Carolina in 1772 and expanded into its own building in 1805. Lastly, the study visits Miss Sarah Pierce’s pious and pioneering Protestant school from 1792, later to become the Litchfield Female Academy in Connecticut.

These three schools vary widely in culture and design. Yet, there are common physical and pedagogical themes that begin to arise from this Revolutionary period. Some examples of themes include: the significance of status and class; the question of form versus function; architectural symbolism and identity; beliefs about what skills women should be taught and the curriculum they desire, need, and deserve; the fusion of religion and education and its architectural evidence; the power of one zealous woman and female accomplishment in adversity; the camaraderie and mentoring that develops among female students far from home; the concern for safety both regarding the building’s construction and the women’s moral protection; and despite the intense surveillance, the local male/female antics that ensue around the architecture of these women’s educational spaces. Although, Thomas Jefferson and others of this era saw female education as primarily a means to marriage, it is clear that the architecture of these three buildings from the late 18th and early 19th century sought so much more. Evident in their physical and social environments are lasting elements of motherhood, womanhood, and citizenry, as well as independence, spirit and personal pride.

Bevin and Vito Cetta Endowed Scholarship Fund

To provide financial aid to one of more deserving undergraduate or graduate students of African-American descent who are enrolled full-time in the University of Virginia School of Architecture.

Disciplines:

Qualifications: Applicants must be enrolled full-time in the University of Virginia School of Archiecture and of African-American descent.

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